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Getting Started

  • What is Wefunder?

    We help everyone invest as little as $100 in the startups they love.  

    You can think of us like “Kickstarter for investing”. 

    Unlike Kickstarter, you are not buying a product or donating to an artist. Instead, you are investing in a business with the hope of earning a return. 

    You decide which companies are worthy of funding. If the business does well, you may make money.  If it doesn’t do well, you lose all your money. 

    Either way, you join a community of other investors who seek to help the startup succeed. You sometimes get neat perks from the companies too. 

  • How is Wefunder different from the stock market?

    Startups on Wefunder are much earlier-stage than companies listed on the NASDAQ or the New York Stock Exchange. Here are a few big differences:

  • Wait… How is this legal?

    Starting in May of 2016, thanks to a new law called Regulation Crowdfunding, it became legal for everyone to invest small amounts of money in the startups they believed in. 

    From 1933 to 2016, it was illegal to make an investment in a private company unless you were an “accredited investor” (i.e., rich).

    We started Wefunder to fix that, because we weren’t rich, and we wanted to invest in our friends. The first thing we had to do was convince Congress to change the law. We managed to do that, and here we are today! 

  • Why should I invest in startups?

    It shouldn't be to make lots of money! This isn't the stock market. Startups are much riskier and more likely to fail.  Greed is a bad reason to invest.

    Of course, if you invest wisely, you can make money.  Our advice?  Invest only in what you understand (and preferably love). If you are a customer and love the product, then it’s more likely it’s a good investment. If you don’t understand it, it may be a bad idea to invest. 

    Our opinion is that investing should not be solely about earning a return.  To invest in something as risky as a startup, you should feel something extra, beyond just the business model.  For us, that “something extra” is the personal fulfillment we get from helping a founder take “their shot” at making our world a slightly better place.  We also think it’s pretty cool to learn about different industries when we get updates from the founder.

  • Any tips for a first-time investor on Wefunder?

    Our advice?  Start off slow.

    • Expect to lose it all.  Never invest more than you can afford to lose.

    • Only invest in what you understand.  Preferably, a product or mission that you love.

    • Do your research.  If you have questions, ask the founders. You can ask the founders by posting on the Q&A section of their campaign page, which is all the way at the bottom under the Interview section.

    • Diversify. It’s better to make multiple small investments rather than one large one.  Plus, it’ll help you learn more.  

    • Look at other investors. Startup valuations can be hard to understand for a new investor.  If the terms seem absurd, look to see if an experienced investor has also invested under them.  If not, hold off.

    • Be helpful. Try to be helpful after you invest.  It’s more fun.  Plus, being known as a helpful investor may eventually lead to getting invited to our upcoming VIP club.
  • What kind of companies are on Wefunder?

    As we like to say, nearly the entire American economy!  That’s the fun part!

    We’ve helped fund over $55 million in startups like:

    • Moonshots like flying cars, space telescopes, and fusion reactors
    • Neighborhood businesses like café’s , restaurants, and breweries
    • Software like mobile apps and online education
    • Biotechnology like glowing plants and researching cancer cures
    • Entertainment like Hollywood studios and immersive theater
    • And more…

    The one commonality?  All of the companies on Wefunder that succeed at their fundraising have a community of people who love them. 

  • After I invest, how often should I expect updates?

    Wefunder really wants to keep you informed going forward, but we can’t guarantee it. Though we try our best to maintain all of our relationships with the issuers on our portal, it may not last beyond the completion of the offering. Wefunder recommends that founders send out an update to their investor at least once a quarter, but you can also ask the founders for an update by posting on the Q&A section of their campaign page, which is all the way at the bottom under the Interview section.

    Most companies are also legally required to issue an Annual Report 120 days after the end of their fiscal year.  The annual report is a more comprehensive update with their latest financials, board members, new financings, and more.  In some circumstances, an issuer may no longer be required to file this information, though we encourage them to do so, anyways. Most companies have their fiscal year end on December 31st, and their annual reports come out on April 30th

  • Is Wefunder regulated?

    Very much so!  Our friends at the SEC and FINRA keep a close eye on us. Together, they wrote around 1,000 pages of regulations that we comply with.

  • Where does my money go after I invest?

    Wefunder is prohibited by law from touching your money.

    When you invest, your funds are transferred to an escrow account, in custody of Boston Private Bank.  If the fundraise succeeds, your money will be released to the startup. Otherwise, it will be refunded to you. 

  • Do you recommend good investments?

    No!  It’s illegal for us to endorse or recommend any company. 

    But even if it wasn’t illegal, we don’t want Wefunder to be a “gatekeeper” that picks and chooses which ideas are worthy of funding.  That’s for you to decide.

    No company on Wefunder – no matter where it appears on our web site – is endorsed by us.  Also, while we may sometimes help companies “make their profiles look pretty”, all of this information is provided and fact-checked as true by the companies, not us.     

    While we don’t vet ideas, we do a fair amount to make sure there is no hint of fraud, including doing background checks on all of the founders, and verifying that all of the documents they’ve provided comply with the law. 

  • Why did you create Wefunder?

    Initially, we created it for ourselves.  We wanted to invest in our friends.  We also wanted to support causes we cared about with our dollars, like revitalizing American manufacturing or researching cancer. We see every startup as a social movement to change the world in one specific way.  We wanted to join more of those movements, and help where we could. 

    That’s also why we became a Public Benefit Corporation.  We aim to make capitalism work better, by sprinkling the Silicon Valley fairy dust across the rest of America.  We want to help thousands more potential founders get off the ground and take their shot. 

    Please join us!

Risks

  • Just how risky are startups?

    Very! You should only invest what you can afford to lose. Do not invest so much that it would impact your lifestyle or retirement plans. Every investment listed on Wefunder is much riskier than a public company listed on the stock market. It is entirely possible that you will lose every dollar you invest on Wefunder.

  • How can I decrease the risk?

    You are more likely to avoid loss by diversifying your investments, focusing on areas in which you have expertise, and investing in startups whose products you passionately use. Even professional investors have a difficult time predicting exactly how startups will earn money in the future (e.g., Google in 1999). Investing in what you know and find personally valuable is an important signal of a good investment.

  • How many investments should I make?

    We recommend making several small investments each year rather than one large one. For instance, if you decide you can safely invest $5,000 per year in startups, it'll be less risky to make ten $500 investments instead of a single $5,000 one. You should never invest more than you can afford to lose.

  • Is an equity investment appropriate for me?

    If you can't afford to lose every dollar you invest on Wefunder, the answer is no. If you can't afford to wait 7+ years for a return, the answer is also no.

    You might have a strong belief in the future success of a company, but it's safer to think of an equity investment as a lottery ticket that might pay off in the very long term.

    Unlike the stock market, investment outcomes are much more binary (complete failure or wild success), and there's no stock market that'll allow you to easily re-sell your investment stake to someone else unless the company is acquired or prepares for an IPO.

  • Is a debt investment appropriate for me?

    Compared to equity investments, loans can be slightly less risky, but also have a smaller upside. You should still assume that even a loan will not be paid back. Never invest more than you can afford to lose. 

  • Can I easily resell my investment?

    It's safest to assume you cannot resell your investment to another investor. First, there is not yet a liquid secondary market like the New York Stock Exchange for private companies. Regulation Crowdfunding also specifically prohibits the resale of securities for one year, except to the issuer, an accredited investor, a family member, or their trust.

  • Will my percentage ownership be diluted?

    Yes. An equity stake will almost certainly be diluted.

    Successful startups host many rounds of financings, all the way to an IPO. For each financing, the startup issues additional stock to the new investors. As long as the value of the company increases with each funding round, this is healthy and normal. For example, the first investor in Facebook, Peter Thiel, originally purchased ~10% of the company for $500,000. By 2011, that stake was diluted down to under 3%, but estimated to be worth ~$2 billion.

    Sometimes, when things are not going well, the startup is given the option of going bankrupt or raising more money in a "down round," which means the value of the company decreased since the last financing. This is very bad for the founders and past investors alike; the dilution happens much more rapidly. But it's preferable to the startup going bankrupt and the investors losing everything.

  • Will my investment have voting rights?

    It's rare for an investment on Wefunder to offer voting rights directly to smaller investors because founders fear it can scare off venture capitalists who invest in later rounds.  They are concerned with the hassle of collecting thousands of signatures to make any major decision. You should assume your investment does not include voting rights unless specified otherwise.

  • Will the startup use Wefunder in the future?

    Wefunder provides startups free continued access to our platform, but there is no guarantee they will continue using our services.

Earning a Return

  • How do I earn a return?

    The amount you may earn depends on the type of investment contract the company is offering.

    There are four classes on Wefunder:

    • Debt.  Some local businesses offer a simple loan or revenue share.  A simple loan, just like your car loan, has a fixed repayment schedule known in advance.  Unlike a loan, a revenue share returns a fixed amount of money (such as 2X your investment), but the time it takes to repay depends on how well the business does.  The faster the business grows revenue, the faster you earn a return, and the higher your effective interest rate.  

    • Convertibles. Most early-stage technology startups use a Convertible Note or Simple Agreement for Future Equity. These will convert your investment to stock at a later date if the company raises a "priced round" from major investors, most often venture capitalists. At this point, you are a shareholder owning equity, and you earn a return if the value of that stock goes up over time, and you are able to sell it.

    • Stock, No Dividends. When a startup is at a stage where they can afford to pay lawyers tens of thousands of dollars, they will do a "priced round". Like the stock market, you are buying equity at a fixed price per share (or unit for LLC's).  If the company is successful, the value of the stock can increase with each subsequent round of financing, until the company is acquired or goes public.  Then you earn a return.

    • Stock, Dividends.  While a tech startup almost never offers dividends, a later-stage local business - such as a brewery opening a second location - often will.  The type of dividend can vary.  Some might offer a fixed dividend per share per year. Some might offer a percentage of profits.  A common scenario is also to "swap" the dividend after your investment is repaid.  For instance, a brewery might share 80% of its profits until the investors are repaid, and then 20% thereafter in perpetuity. 
  • How long until I see a return?

    The amount of time it takes to see a return is highly dependent on the type of investment contract.

    • Debt.  A simple loan will define the number of months until it is paid back.  For a revenue share, it depends on their projections for future revenue.  The faster the business makes money, the faster you will see a return.

    • Convertibles & Stock with No Dividends.  You are waiting until the company goes public or is acquired.  This can take a very long time. It took the early investors in Harmonix (the creators of Guitar Hero) over 10 years to earn a return.

    • Stock with Dividends.  This depends on the specific investment agreement.  Typically, dividends are a percentage of profits. Therefore, the amount of time to see a return depends on how profitable the business is.
  • How is the valuation determined?

    Market demand often determines the valuation. Typically, before a company fundraises on Wefunder, at least one professional investor has invested in the company. Professional investors are much more likely to understand the current market value of startups. This valuation shifts with time, depending on the amount of capital chasing startups. Right now, early-stage high-growth startups are often valued at $3 to $20 million for their first financing. Lifestyle businesses are valued at less. Companies that have raised several rounds of financing and are further along are worth far more.

Investment Contracts

  • What is a SAFE?

    First developed by Y Combinator in 2013, a SAFE grants an investor the right to obtain equity at a future date if the startup sells shares in a future financing. It has been historically used by top startups in Silicon Valley raising money from accredited angel investors. You should only invest in a SAFE if you believe that the startup can raise financing in the future from professional investors.

    SAFEs are used by early-stage startups because they delay the difficult task of figuring out how much a startup is worth. It is also a much cheaper and simpler contract than priced equity rounds, which may require months of negotiation and upwards of 30 pages of legalese costing tens of thousands of dollars.

    The number of shares you receive is determined at the next priced financing when professional investors – typically venture capitalists – set the price for preferred stock. Then, calculated by using the Valuation Cap and sometimes the Discount Rate, your SAFE often converts into shares at a lower price than the venture capitalists paid, since you invested earlier.

    The Valuation Cap is the most important term in this security. It puts a maximum price on the price of the stock - the lower the price, the more shares you will get. If you invest in a startup with a valuation cap of $8 million, and they later raise at a $20 million Pre-Money Valuation, the amount of stock you'll get will be priced off the $8 million number. But, if the next investors value the company at $4 million, that will be your price instead (perhaps further discounted by the Discount Rate ).

    Unlike a Convertible Note, a SAFE is not a loan. As such, it does not accrue interest, have a maturity date, or have a legal obligation to be paid back. This makes it a simpler and cheaper way to finance a startup, and it typically better aligns with the intention of most early stage equity investors who never intended to be lenders (convertible notes are rarely if ever paid back in cash despite being a debt instrument – the startup just goes bankrupt).

    Further Reading:


    There are two main variations of the SAFE.

    Y Combinator SAFE

    Y Combinator initially developed the SAFE for Accredited Investors investing under Regulation D offerings. Most startups who use this variant only intend to accept funding from perhaps a dozen rich investors, or through many investors investing via a WeFund SPV.


    Wefunder Crowdfunding SAFE

    Accepting funding from hundreds of direct online investors investing as little as $100 requires a SAFE with several extra protections not common in Regulation D fundraises with Accredited Investors. The Wefunder SAFE treats Major Investors (typically defined as investing between $10,000 and $25,000) much like the Y Combinator variation, but it has no voting rights for Minor Shareholders.

    The Wefunder SAFE:

    • Has Repurchase Rights for Minor Shareholders. Except for Major Shareholders, the company may opt to repurchase an investor's SAFE at any time prior to conversion at the greater of the purchase amount or the Fair Market Value, as determined by an appraiser the company chooses. Startups want this because they are scared that venture capitalists may not fund their companies at a later date because they have a "messy cap table".
    • Can be Amended by One Lead Investor. The lack of a maturity date and interest rate negates the need for common amendments of convertible note financings. However, if a particularly complex issue in a follow-on financing requires an amendment to the SAFE, founders are scared they'll be unable to chase down thousands of signatures. The company can designate a Lead Investor Representative, and all investors agree to allow that person to unilaterally amend the SAFE. But that person may not change the Valuation Cap.
    • Grants CEO Power of Attorney for Minor Shareholders. Once the SAFE converts into equity, investors who are not Major Shareholders grant the current CEO a power of attorney to vote all shares and execute any documents on their behalf. This mitigates the potential problem of hundreds of minor shareholders slowing down further follow-on financings.
  • What is a Convertible Note?

    A convertible note is an unsecured loan that converts to stock at some point in the future. They are one the most popular forms of seed-stage startup investing because of their history, although the SAFE is rapidly becoming more prevalent.

    Convertible notes are also useful because they delay the difficult task of figuring out how much the startup is worth. The number of shares you receive is determined at the next qualified financing (typically $1 million), when venture capitalists set the price for preferred stock. Then, calculated by using the Valuation Cap, Discount Rate, and Interest Rate, your loan converts into shares at a lower price than the venture capitalists paid, since you invested earlier.

    If the startup does not raise another round of funding, the note becomes due at the maturity date, typically in 18-24 months. Convertible notes, however, are rarely repaid in cash. Instead, the note usually converts to equity at a pre-set target price.

    The discount and interest rates have a relatively minor impact on future returns. The most important term to focus on – which can greatly impact the price of your future shares – is the Valuation Cap. This is usually set between $3 to $20 million, depending on how "hot" the startup is.

    Learn more about convertible notes.

  • How does Preferred Stock work?

    Only a few years ago, legal fees cost upwards of $50,000 to properly set up a stock financing. It was uneconomical to pay this amount unless venture capitalists were investing millions in a Series A. Nowadays, some startups can use open-sourced "priced round" documents to reduce the costs of a stock financing at the seed stage.

    There are a host of terms that can be negotiated in a stock financing, but this is done by the "lead" investor, who typically invests upwards of $200,000.

    As a non-lead investor investing a small amount, the most important terms to pay attention to are the Post-Money Valuation or the Pre-Money Valuation. This is effectively what the company is considered to be worth, and with it, you can calculate your percentage ownership. Comparatively, the price of the stock is relatively meaningless.

    One of the most popular open-sourced priced round agreements is the Series Seed, developed by Fenwick lawyer Ted Wang.

    Read more about Series Seed.
    Learn more about terms

  • Are debt or revenue shares on Wefunder?

    High-growth startups almost never raise seed-stage funding with loans, as debt doesn't offer enough of a return to account for the risk investors are taking.

    However, loans or promissory notes can be more appropriate for small businesses. One benefit of investing with a loan is that the investor often receives cash every quarter or year, as the principal is repaid alongside the interest rate. The downside of debt is you have no equity stake if the company suddenly becomes much more valuable.


    Wefunder Promissory Note

    Many businesses on Wefunder use our template agreement. The Wefunder Promissory Note is good for debt fundraises that don't require much complexity. It can be powerful for crowdfunding when combined with the Investor Perk Agreement. It may also be paid back by the company at any time.

    Important terms in this note include:

    • Interest Rate. The interest rate per annum.
    • Maturity Date. How many years until the loan is fully paid back?
    • Quarterly or Annual Disbursement. Companies choose to make annual or quarterly payments.
    • Grace Period. By default, these loans are deferred until 30 days after their crowdfunding deadline date. Some businesses may defer the start of their loan at a later date, such as when their business is scheduled to open.
    • Defer Payments. By default, every company can miss one payment without being in default. This is meant to allow businesses time to recover if they have a bad year.
    • Secured. Some loans may be secured with all property of the business.
    • Personal Guarantee. Some loans may have an individual that personally guarantees payment.
    • Subordination. Some loans are subordinate to a major bank lender.

    To preview a sample, download the Wefunder Promissory Note.


    Revenue Loan Agreement

    This is a promissory note that is paid back from a share of the revenues of the business.

    Important terms in this note include:

    • Gross or Net Revenues. Net revenues exclude returns or shipping costs.
    • Revenue Percentage. This is the percentage of revenue that is shared.
    • Repayment Amount. Typically 1.5-3.0X, this is the maximum amount you will be paid back.
    • Quarterly or Annual Disbursement. Companies choose to make annual or quarterly payments.
    • Defer Payments. By default, every company can miss one payment without being in default.
    • Secured. Some loans may be secured with all property of the business.

    To preview a sample, download the Revenue Loan Agreement.

Payment

  • What are my payment options?

    You can pay using a bank transfer, check, credit card, or wire transfer. If you choose to pay by credit card, there is a $5,000 limit.

    International investors can pay by wire transfer or credit card. For wire transfers, many investors recommend TransferWise.

  • What fees do I have to pay to make an investment?

    For all payment methods other than credit cards, there is 2% service fee added to the investment amount, capped at $75, but minimum $7.  

    For credit cards, our service fee is 3%, with a minimum of $7.  We discount our service fee to 2% when other payment methods are used.

    All fees are refunded if you cancel your investment.

  • Do my funds enter an escrow account?

    Yes. Your investment is placed in an escrow account hosted at Boston Private Bank. Funds are transferred to the business only after the fundraising target has been met.

  • How long do I have to send a payment?

    You have 7 days to ensure payment is sent to an escrow account or your investment application will be automatically canceled. 

  • How do I check my payment status?

    Head over to your investor dashboard to see the status of your payment. You can also update or change your payment method on this dashboard. 

  • My payment failed. Help!

    When a payment fails, we send you an email. You can follow the instructions in the email to fix the failed payment. 

    If you didn't get the email, you can find which of your investments is awaiting payment on your investor dashboard.

  • I'm an international investor and I need the IBAN number.

    We do not have an IBAN number. You should be able to send a BIC/SWIFT wire through your bank. 

    If this proves difficult, you may need to contact customer support. We also recommend using TransferWise (transferwise.com). 

  • How is Wefunder compensated?

    For Regulation Crowdfunding, Wefunder charges investors a small service fee (ranging from $7 to $75 based on investment size). We also charge the company up to 7% of their total funding volume for Regulation Crowdfunding.

    For Regulation D, Wefunder charges up to 20% Carried Interest .

    For Regulation A+, Wefunder does not charge any fees.

  • Why is my investment still pending?

    Your investment may still be pending because we are still processing your payment. 

    • Bank Transfers (ACH): It takes up to 7 business days to confirm that funds are deposited. 

    • Checks: we will credit your account within 2 business days of receipt, unless there is insufficient information. 

    • Wire Transfers: we will credit your account within 1 day of receipt (usually same day).

    To avoid any potential delays, make sure to include your unique investment ID on your wire or check.


  • I've been waitlisted. What's that?

    Some investors become waitlisted when so many people apply to invest that the company receives more money than they can legally accept. Instead of reducing the size of everyone's investment, founders may choose which investors to accept and may prioritize those who can help their company the most. 

    You can decrease your chance of being waitlisted by applying to invest early, connecting your social networks, and filling out your profile.

  • Why is my investment still in escrow?

    The closing process is long and mighty! There are a bunch of SEC guidelines and regulations we have to abide by, lots of paperwork to do – you get the idea. It takes 1-2 months for us to finalize a fundraise after it closes. Once all funds have been sent to the company, your investment will be marked as confirmed.

Refunds

  • Can I cancel my investment and get a refund?

    Yes. You can change your mind anytime up to 48 hours before a close, and you will receive a full refund, including any fees. Unfortunately, investments cannot be cancelled within the 48 hour window. 

    You'll receive a five-day notice via e-mail when a fundraise is about to close.  Once the 5 day notice expires, you may no longer cancel your investment.  

    Once the minimum funding target is met, some companies do a "rolling close", where prior investments are executed and funds transferred, but the round is still open to receive new investments. You'll still receive a five-day notice if this occurs.  Once your funds are transferred to the company, you no longer can cancel your investment or obtain a refund. 


  • How will I receive a refund?

    When you cancel your investment or a campaign fails, a refund will automatically be sent back to the bank account or credit card that was used to make the investment. If you sent a check or a wire, you will receive an email with instructions to send us your wire or bank account info before we can send the refund. 

    We can also refund investments in Wefunder credit, which can be used toward future investments and fees!

  • How long will it take to receive my refund?

    It depends how you paid. We initiate refunds as we receive them, but it can take up to 14 days to reach you.

  • What limits are there on canceling an investment?

    Once the fundraise has a close and your 5-day notice expires, you no longer can cancel your investment or obtain a refund.

    Once the minimum funding target is met, some companies do a "rolling close", where prior investments are executed and funds transferred, but the company still open to receive new investments. 

    You'll still receive a five-day notice when any close is about to happen.

  • Can the company not accept my investment?

    Yes.  Companies may choose not to accept your investment for any reason. One reason may be that they discovered you worked for a major competitor.

    After the round closes, and the company has countersigned the contract and received the funds, your investment can no longer be canceled.

  • When will the fundraising round close?

    The fundraise round will close for certain at the company's offering deadline. 

    However, almost always, a successful fundraise closes earlier (although it must be open for at least 21 days).  Also, some companies do a "rolling close" after 21 days have passed and their minimum fundraising target is reached.

    When a round closes earlier, you will receive a five-day notice before the closing date via email.  

  • What happens if the fundraise fails?

    You'll be notified via email and receive a full refund of your investment, along with any fee you've paid.

Legal

  • Which offerings am I legally allowed to invest in?

    It depends on whether you’re an accredited or non-accredited investor. If you’re accredited, you can participate in all security offers. If you are non-accredited, you can invest in Reg A+ and Reg CF offers.

  • What’s an accredited investor?

    Accredited investors are wealthy people: typically, they make over $200,000 per year ($300,000 if joint with spouse) or have over $1 million in assets, minus their home.

    To find out your investment limits, open an investor account.

  • How much am I allowed to invest?

    It's complicated.  Thankfully, when you sign up for a Wefunder account, we'll do all these calculations for you.

    The amount you are legally allowed to invest depends on which Regulation the company uses to fundraise.

    For Regulation Crowdfunding Offerings, Wefunder calculates your annual investment limit based on the net worth and income provided upon account opening. Investment limits are for every 12 month period. Every investment in a Regulation Crowdfunding offering counts towards the annual limit. We will not let you invest more than this amount. The SEC made it pretty complicated to calculate this number, but if you're curious:

    • Everyone can invest at least $2,200

    • If either your net worth or income is below $107k, you may legally invest a maximum of 5% of the lesser number.

    • If both your net worth or income is above $107k, you may legally invest a maximum of 10% of the lesser number.

    • No one may invest more than $107,000. Accredited investors are subject to the same investment limitations as everyone else, no matter how silly that is.

    For Regulation A+ offerings, unaccredited investors can invest up to 10% of income or net worth per year, whichever is greater.

    For Regulation D offerings, only accredited investors may invest, and they have no limits. 

  • Can I invest if I don't live in the United States?

    We have investors from all around the world!  With one exception, we accept investments from international investors, as long as you represent that you are complying with the law in your country.  

    The one exception is the Province of Quebec, which requested that we bar their residents from investing.

  • Can I invest via an entity?

    Yes, you can invest via an entity, though we currently do not support self-directed IRAs.

    After you click the green Invest button on the company's profile page, you'll get to your investment confirmation page. Under Personal Info, you can add an entity to link to your Wefunder account.

  • Can I add a spouse or beneficiary to my investment?

    Unfortunately, we do not offer joint investments. Each contract must be between the individual investor and the founder of the company receiving the investment.

Troubleshooting